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Posts for: February, 2015

By Drs. DuBose & Papadea Family & Cosmetic Dentistry
February 23, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: orthodontics   retainers  
RetainersHelpyouProtectYourNewlyAlignedTeeth

Orthodontics can produce an amazing smile transformation. With today’s advanced appliances and techniques even the most difficult malocclusions (bad bites) can be overcome. All of this innovation, however, depends on one basic anatomical fact: though firmly set in the mouth, our teeth can still move.

Teeth are actually held in place by the periodontal ligament, a strong, elastic tissue that attaches to them through tiny collagen fibers on one side of the ligament and to the jawbone with similar fibers on the other side. When pressure is placed against a tooth, the bone on the opposite side of the force begins to dissolve (resorb), allowing the tooth to move. As it moves, new bone is built up behind the tooth, to stabilize it. Orthodontists take advantage of this natural mechanism through orthodontic hardware like braces that applies pressure in the desired direction of movement, while the ligament and bone do the rest.

There is, though, a downside to this process. The teeth, bone and gum tissues can contain a kind of “memory” for the former natural position of the teeth. Over time, the lower front teeth tend to take a gradual migratory movement back towards their original position. Also, as we age the lower front teeth may crowd each other as there is a genetic influence for teeth to move to the midline of the face, causing a pressure that allows the skinny lower front teeth to slip behind each other. As a result of both of these tendencies, corrected teeth may retreat from their new positions.

To stop these tendencies, we use an appliance known as a retainer after braces or other hardware is removed. As the name implies, this appliance “retains” the teeth in their new position. For structural “memory,” the retainer will keep the teeth in their new position until the impulse to return to the old one has faded, about eighteen months. Retainers can also slow or stop the natural genetic influence of movement, but it may mean wearing a retainer for an indefinite period, especially individuals who’ve undergone orthodontic treatment later in life.

The length of time you’ll need to wear a retainer after braces — and what type, whether a removable appliance or one permanently attached — will depend on a number of factors including the type of malocclusion, your individual mouth structure and age. We’ll recommend the best option that ensures the best chance of keeping your teeth in their new position.

If you would like more information on retainers after orthodontic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Why Orthodontic Retainers?


By Drs. DuBose & Papadea Family & Cosmetic Dentistry
February 13, 2015
Category: Oral Health
MeetBradyReiterandYoullBelieveintheToothFairy

The Tooth Fairy has been easing the process of losing baby teeth for hundreds of years — at least 500 years according to one authority on the subject. Her name is Brady Reiter, and while she looks only age 11 in earth years, she is actually a 500-year-old Tooth Fairy; at least she plays one on DVD.

Brady is the star of Tooth Fairy 2, a new DVD comedy also starring Larry the Cable Guy as a novice Tooth Fairy doing penance for questioning the existence of the magical sprite who leaves payment under pillows for lost teeth.

In a charming interview with Dear Doctor magazine, Brady says it wasn't very difficult to play an ancient tooth fairy trapped in a child's body.

“I'm kind of more mature than an average 11-year-old because I have older brothers and sisters,” Brady told Dear Doctor. “It was kind of just connecting with my inner 500-year-old. It was very fun to play a character like that!”

Brady also enjoyed working with Larry, who dons a pink tutu and fluffy wings for his role.

“In hair and makeup every morning, he'd be making all these jokes,” she said. “He just cracked us up 100 percent of the time!”

But as much fun as Brady had on the set, her character, Nyx, is all business. And that's how Brady, who recently lost her last baby tooth, has always believed it should be.

“My whole life I thought the Tooth Fairy is just like Nyx,” Brady said. “They know what to do, they come in, they're professionals, you don't see them and they never make a mistake and forget your tooth. Just like Santa Claus, tooth fairies are very professional.”

Brady also told Dear Doctor that she is very excited to be helping the National Children's Oral Health Foundation fight childhood tooth decay as spokesfairy for America's ToothFairy Kids Club. The club offers kids personalized letters from the Tooth Fairy along with lots of encouraging oral health tips and fun activities.

If you would like to enroll your child in the club — it's free! — please visit www.AmericasToothFairyKids.org. And to make sure your child's teeth and your own are decay-free and as healthy as possible, please contact us to schedule your next appointment.